What We're Saying

Memorial Day: A Day of Remembrance

IA HONORS OUR MILITARY WHO MADE THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE FOR OUR COUNTRY.

United States Marine Corps War Memorial, Arlington, VA. Photo © Orhan Çam /Adobe Stock
United States Marine Corps War Memorial, Arlington, VA. Photo © Orhan Çam /Adobe Stock

Some of the most moving war memorials honoring our military who died in service are located in Washington, DC, and nearby Virginia. At IA, we thank these heroes for their bravery and sacrifice and we remember.

 

Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, DC. Photo © bbourdages /Adobe Stock
Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, DC. Photo © bbourdages /Adobe Stock

Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, DC – This memorial has special meaning to me as my father, a staff sergeant with the US Air Force at the time, was one of the fortunate service members to make it back from Vietnam not only alive but without injury as well.  It was this service to his country that led my father to seek a career protecting and serving others as a Federal Law Enforcement Officer with the US Park Police. The powerful display of those less fortunate listed on this particular monument is a humbling reminder to be appreciative and grateful.
Katrina Reid, Principal/Managing Director of Global Marketing

 

World War II Memorial, Washington, DC. Photo © adamparent /Adobe Stock
World War II Memorial, Washington, DC. Photo © adamparent /Adobe Stock

World War II Memorial, Washington, DC – My father’s Naval Academy class of ‘45 was graduated early so that they could go to war in Europe and Asia.  He “hitch hiked” from ship to ship across the Pacific in search of his assigned Fletcher-class destroyer, the USS Burns, and into harm’s way.
Mary Lee Duff, Principal/Director of Workplace Strategy

 

United States Marine Corps War Memorial, Washington, DC. Photo © demerzel21 /Adobe Stock
United States Marine Corps War Memorial, Arlington, VA. Photo © demerzel21 /Adobe Stock

US Marine Corps War Memorial, Arlington, VA – My father, John Truhan, enlisted in 1943 with the 3rd Marine Division, feeling the same urgency and duty that most of his generation did.  If you were a Marine in WWII, the odds were very high that you would be called to serve in the Pacific theater, which he did, with the invasion of Iwo Jima being his first combat experience. So, he was there on the flanks of the mountain and under fire when the scene that this memorial represents played-out.
James Truhan, Director of Workplace Strategy

 

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